Skip to content
Guest Episode

The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 389 – Knock at the Cabin (2023) & You People (2023) – The Big Racket (1976) and Stone Cold (1991) – Guest: Nick Rogers (Midwest Film Journal)

In this episode, I welcome my friend Nick Rogers (from MidwestFilmJournal.com) onto the show to review M. Night Shyamalan’s new film, Knock at the Cabin and the new Netflix comedy, You People. For potpourri, Nick shares his thoughts on 1976’s The Big Racket while I unveil my Chain Link Viewing Project and share my thoughts on 1991’s Stone Cold.

Mike White 0

The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 388 – 2022 Year in Review – Best Movies of the Year and Viewing Stats

Happy New Year and welcome to The Obsessive Viewer’s 2022 Year in Review episode! It’s our annual episode where Tiny, Mike, and I share our movie viewing stats for the year and our top ten favorite movies lists. So join us as we reflect on another year in our TENTH Year in Review episode!

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

My Top Ten Movies of 2022 and Thoughts on the Year

Well, 2022 is coming to a close and we’re about to usher in a new year. I have no doubt 2023 will be a big year for movies but it will especially big for The Obsessive Viewer since this little corner of the internet will be turning 10 years old in February (with the podcast turning 10 in June). So before I send off 2022 with a bunch of words about stuff I watched and enjoyed, I want to take this moment to thank anyone and everyone reading this for taking the time to read what I write and/or listen to what I record. It’s much appreciated and I’m looking forward to doing this through 2023 and beyond.

Guest Episode 0

The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 387 – IFJA Ten Best Films of 2022 – Guest: Sam Watermeier (Midwest Film Journal)

In this episode, I welcome my friend Sam Watermeier back to the show to help me close out the year with a breakdown of the Indiana Film Journalists Association top films of 2022. We also go over Sam’s personal top ten list.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Avatar: The Way of Water (2022)

It would have been naive to think James Cameron’s storytelling abilities would have changed for the better in the 13 year span between the first two Avatar films. There’s no denying that Cameron is responsible for some of film’s biggest and most innovative titles. Since Avatar is his passion project and Pandora is where he’s looking to park himself for the remainder of his career, it’s simply mind-boggling that this (and 2009’s Avatar) is the best he can muster.

Andy Carr 0

The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 386 – Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (2022) & Smile (2022) – Guests: Andy Carr (Odd Trilogies Podcast & Film Yap) and Mitch Ringenberg (Midwest Film Journal)

In this episode, I welcome my friends Andy Carr and Mitch Ringenberg back to the show to review Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery and Smile! Then, in a Potpourri segment, Andy and I briefly talk about The Menu and Bones and All.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (2022)

When it is not held back by a disconnected subplot and an unimaginative character introduction, Wakanda Forever flourishes as an expansive entry in the Black Panther mythos. Above all, however, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever is a respectful and loving tribute to Chadwick Boseman’s legacy not only as King T’Challa, but to the actor himself as well.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Windfall (2022)

There’s a slight crisis of identity to the tone and pacing of Windfall, overall. The weighty themes and serious nature of the plot sometimes clash with the almost comic tone of some of the situations that arise. When more serious and immediate developments occur, there’s a bit of whiplash for the audience as we’ve moved into a more conventional thriller from the semi-absurd plot in which Windfall feels the most at home.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Clerks III (2022)

There was once some charm to the idea of Smith revisiting the Clerks universe every decade or so to check in with the characters as he (and they) reach certain milestones of aging. However romantic as that notion was at the end of Clerks II, Clerks III obliterates it and ensures that Smith will likely never return to this series. Following the abysmal showing here and in 2019’s Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, which suffered the same nostalgic callback issues as Clerks III, it’s just as unlikely that this reviewer will be persuaded to give Smith’s future work much, if any, attention.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Glorious (2022)

Cosmic horror in a rest stop bathroom sounds like a bizarrely twisted country song. It’s not. It’s the elevator pitch for Glorious, a bizarrely twisted Lovecraftian horror film premiering this week on Shudder. Glorious pits the heartbroken Wes (Ryan Kwanten) against the disembodied voice of a demigod of unimaginable power named Ghat (J.K. Simmons) with the fate of the universe hanging in the balance. It’s not a battle of wills that brings these two together. It’s a request to lend a helping hand so that the universe may continue on its merry way existing and fostering life.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Fall (2022)

While the tension and most of the visual effects are strong enough to trigger anxiety in even the least acrophobic viewer, Fall’s script seems like someone had an idea and built an unoriginal, cobbled together drama around that concept. If you’re looking for a anxiety producing acrophobic thriller you can shut your brain off for, Fall should deliver. If you’re looking for something a bit more character driven, you’d be better off looking elsewhere.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Day Shift (2022)

Day Shift, the debut film from director J.J. Perry, is the latest offering from Netflix’s “throw it all at the wall and see what sticks” streaming blockbuster playbook. Despite dressing up an overdone action movie skeleton with genre fare, Day Shift succeeds by the skin of its stylistic action choreography and fun buddy energy between Dave Franco and Jamie Foxx. Though the story isn’t as meaty or interesting as you might like, the energy and quick pace of the film helps Day Shift stand out from the pack.

Matt Hurt's Columns 0

Movie Review: Summering (2022)

James Ponsoldt’s Summering is a peculiar coming of age drama with some slight genre leanings that spring up seemingly out of nowhere. The film is very clearly a riff on Stand By Me, but it doesn’t have the nuance or even the sense of direction that Rob Reiner’s classic film had. Not by a long shot. Instead, Summering is a tonal mess as the characters are haunted by visions of a dead man whose body they discover and (inexplicably) decide to move and desecrate. Again, this is a coming of age drama, so these genre trappings seem completely random and do not fit well in the narrative at all.