Author Archives: Matt Hurt

The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 315 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 39 (cOVid Potpourri) – Middleditch & Schwartz, Mike Birbiglia’s The New One, John Mulaney & the Sack Lunch Bunch, Community, and Richard Jewell

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OV315 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 39 (cOVid Potpourri) – Middleditch & Schwartz, Mike Birbiglia’s The New One, John Mulaney & the Sack Lunch Bunch, Community, and Richard Jewell

In the midst of a global pandemic and stay at home orders all over the country, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival. In this episode, Kyrsten joins me as we review 2019’s Richard Jewell and the brilliant Middleditch & Schwartz improv specials on Netflix. We then chat about a bunch of other comedy streaming selections.

Runtime: 1:34:27 Continue reading

Movie Review: Vivarium (2020)

Vivarium (2020)

Premise: A young couple looking for the perfect home find themselves trapped in a mysterious labyrinth-like neighborhood of identical houses.

In concept, Vivarium (Latin for “place for life”) has all the makings of a mind-bending sci-fi thriller that should be rich with character development and social commentary. The film features an ominous set design showcasing an empty and endless housing development in which the film’s protagonists become trapped. It’s an idyllic, yet monstrous prison of suburbia and the only inkling of hope they have toward being released is to raise a bizarre alien child that appears in a box on the street.
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The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 314 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Days 20-38 (Sci-Fi Showcase) – The Adjustment Bureau, Next, Minority Report, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Code 8, Vivarium, The X-Files, and Devs (Guest: Ben Sears)

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OV314 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Days 20-38 (Sci-Fi Showcase) – The Adjustment Bureau, Next, Minority Report, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Code 8, Vivarium, The X-Files, and Devs (Guest: Ben Sears)

In the midst of a global pandemic and stay at home orders all over the country, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival. Here is my coverage of cOVid-19 Film Festival Days 20-38: Sci-fi Showcase (April 6-24, 2020). For the spotlight review, frequent guest ad contributor Ben calls in to talk about Alex Garland’s Devs with me in a non-spoiler and spoiler review.

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Movie Review: Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Universal Classic Monsters 8

Son of Frankenstein (1939)

Premise: One of the sons of Frankenstein finds his father’s monster in a coma and revives him, only to find out he is controlled by Ygor who is bent on revenge.

Son of Frankenstein finds Baron Wolf Von Frankenstein (Basil Rathbone) traveling to the village in which his father’s monster wreaked havoc many years after the tragic events transpired. The young baron brings his bride Elsa (Josephine Hutchinson) and son Peter (Donnie Dunagan) to the Frankenstein castle where Wolf is set to collect his inheritance. In the village, the Frankensteins are met with hostility while, in the castle, the Frankenstein patriarch faces off with the heavy shadow of his father’s legacy.
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Movie Review: Dracula’s Daughter (1936) – Universal Classic Monsters 7

Dracula’s Daughter (1936)

Premise: Hungarian countess Marya Zaleska seeks the aid of a noted psychiatrist, hoping to free herself of a mysterious evil influence.

The Universal Monsters’ second direct sequel, 1936’s Dracula’s Daughter, takes a different approach than Bride of Frankenstein before it. Like Bride of Frankenstein, Dracula’s Daughter begins immediately after the events of its predecessor. However, there is no retconning to be found here. Dracula is dead. Long live Dracula. This sequel examines the fallout of the events of the first film through Van Helsing’s (Edward Van Sloan) interactions with the law and the introduction of Hungarian countess Marya Zaleska (Gloria Holden), who is seemingly possessed by the re-deceased Dracula.
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Movie Review: Werewolf of London (1935) – Universal Classic Monsters 6

Werewolf of London (1935)

Premise: The juice of a rare Tibetan flower is the only thing that keeps Dr. Glendon from turning into a werewolf during a full moon.

Though it underperformed commercially compared to the success of The Wolf Man six years later, 1935’s Werewolf of London has the distinction of helping to create much of the mythology that is still associated with werewolves today. Prior to the film, transforming into a werewolf involved witchcraft, did not involve a full moon, and bites were not transformative to humans. Thus the legacy of Werewolf of London is indelible even if the film itself is slightly uneven and muddled with too many protagonists.
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The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 313 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 16 (Netflix Spotlight) – Unicorn Store, The Little Hours, Search Party, and Tiger King

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OV313 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 16 (Netflix Spotlight) – Unicorn Store, The Little Hours, Search Party, and Tiger King

In the midst of a global pandemic and stay at home orders all over the country, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival. Here is my coverage of cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 16: Netflix Spotlight (April 2, 2020). For the spotlight review, Tiny calls in to talk about Tiger King with me in a spoiler review.

This week’s stinger comes from our Patreon-exclusive Vlog: COVID-19: Vlog 2 – TV Shows in Quarantine & I Can’t Grow a Beard – March 30, 2020

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The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 312 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 6 (Mike’s Picks) – The Head Hunter, Little Monsters, Horror Noire, and Freaks

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OV312 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Day 6 (Mike’s Picks) – The Head Hunter, Little Monsters, Horror Noire, and Freaks

In the midst of a global pandemic and stay at home orders all over the country, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival. Here is my coverage of cOVid-19 Film Festival day 6: Programmed by Mike White. For the spotlight review, Mike calls in to talk about Freaks with me in a mostly non-spoiler review.

This week’s stinger comes from our Patreon-exclusive Vlog: COVID-19: Vlog 2 – TV Shows in Quarantine & I Can’t Grow a Beard – March 30, 2020

Runtime: 1:13:57 Continue reading

Movie Review: Bride of Frankenstein (1935) – Universal Classic Monsters 5

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Premise: Mary Shelley reveals the main characters of her novel survived: Dr. Frankenstein, goaded by an even madder scientist, builds his monster a mate.

The first direct sequel in the Universal Classic Monsters chronology is also the final one to be helmed by James Whale (after Frankenstein and The Invisible Man). Bride of Frankenstein is replete with themes of creation and destruction amidst subtext involving identity politics, nature vs nurture, and a healthy of dose of homosexual undercurrents thrown in for good measure. The film builds upon what was previously established in Frankenstein by introducing a more menacing mad scientist character and further humanizing Boris Karloff’s monster. It also pays homage to the woman who created the monster and brings some light religious commentary to the forefront as well.
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Movie Review: The Invisible Man (1933) – Universal Classic Monsters 4

The Invisible Man (1933)

Premise: A scientist finds a way of becoming invisible, but in doing so, he becomes murderously insane.

A man enters an inn, demands privacy, and works tirelessly at mysterious experiments. He’s isolated, agitated, and slowly growing more and more insane. Also, he’s invisible. The Invisible Man is the mind-blowing journey of a man overcome with the conflicting feelings of the power he has gained and the longing to come back to the one he loves. It’s a mad scientist motif that drives a narrative more and more toward an ending that may not be as redemptive or emotionally satisfying as one might expect. With a powerful lead performance by Claude Rains and spectacular visual effects, The Invisible Man leans into its mad scientist’s descent as it leads to a thrilling conclusion.
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Movie Review: The Mummy (1932) – Universal Classic Monsters 3

The Mummy (1932)

Premise: A resurrected Egyptian mummy stalks a beautiful woman he believes to be the reincarnation of his lover and bride.

A year after making his mark as the monster in Frankenstein, Boris Karloff cemented his icon status with his portrayal of Imhotep in 1932’s The Mummy. Despite having a plot that is heavily borrowed from Dracula, The Mummy showcases Karloff’s strength and range as an actor behind it. The film also features an exotic Egyptian locale and set design that is noticeably different from the Gothic horror of Dracula or the villages of Frankenstein. More importantly, The Mummy has tense atmosphere and a sense of grandeur to its monster that keeps it from simply being a rip-off of Dracula.
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The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 311 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Days 4 & 5 (Amazon Prime Weekend) – Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, Never Surrender, Thunder Road, and HBO’s Watchmen

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OV311 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Days 4 & 5 (Amazon Prime Weekend) – Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, Never Surrender, Thunder Road, and HBO’s Watchmen

COVID-19 is sweeping the nation. So, naturally, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival. Here is my coverage of day 4 & 5: Amazon Prime Weekend. For the spotlight review, Tiny calls in to talk about HBO’s Watchmen with me in a non-spoiler and spoiler section.

This week’s stinger is an outtake from our recording.

Runtime: 2:02:15 Continue reading

Movie Review: Frankenstein (1931) – Universal Classic Monsters 2

Frankenstein (1931)

Premise: An obsessed scientist assembles a living being from parts of exhumed corpses.

James Whale’s 1931 adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was released in the same calendar year as Dracula. Together, the two films kicked off the Universal Monsters’ reign in cinemas. While both are similar in their Gothic horror aesthetics, Frankenstein infuses its monster with a science fiction hue to great effect. The scientific and moral concepts at the heart of Frankenstein help enhance the wonderful characterization and tragedy-laden arc of the film’s titular character and his complicated monster.
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The Obsessive Viewer Podcast – Ep 310 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Opening Night and Day 1 – Crawl, The Year of Spectacular Men, Outbreak, The Edge of Seventeen, and Contagion

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OV310 – cOVid-19 Film Festival Opening Night and Day 1 – Crawl, The Year of Spectacular Men, Outbreak, The Edge of Seventeen, and Contagion

COVID-19 is sweeping the nation. So, naturally, I am coping by watching movies and podcasting about them as if they were part of a Film Festival Here is day 1.

This week’s stinger comes from our Patreon-exclusive Vlog: COVID-19 Vlog 1 – Crawl (2019) & Theaters Close – March 17, 2020

Runtime: 1:16:05 Continue reading

Movie Review: Dracula (1931) – Universal Classic Monsters 1

Dracula (1931)

Premise: The ancient vampire Count Dracula arrives in England and begins to prey upon the virtuous young Mina.

1931’s Dracula, the beginning of the Universal Classic Monster films, is a work of stunning beauty and dread from the outset. The detail in the backdrops of the opening scenes is awe-inspiring and lends to an impressive scale and cinematography that has aged extremely well. Within the first few moments, we’re introduced to Count Dracula and his castle. Giant interior scenes are filled with broken staircases and cobwebs. The set design goes a long way in establishing tone and a sense of danger for every character who crosses Dracula’s path. Continue reading